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Four reasons why you should not read Suicide Notes From Beautiful Girls

User ContributedBooksReviews

Frankly, you are probably better off reading a shopping list.

When Suicide Notes From Beautiful Girls by Lynn Weingarten was published last year, it was met with a number of mixed reactions.

Many people could not decide if it was really good or just really horrible. I fell into the group that found the book absolutely abhorrent.

Here are four reasons why you should not read Suicide Notes From Beautiful Girls.

1. It is ridiculously unrealistic

One of the downsides of Young Adult mysteries or thrillers is that you rarely find a book that is even remotely realistic. This book took that to another level. 

There was no police involvement. I mean, seriously? June jumps in and by the second chapter, she is playing Nancy Drew. The police are not involved at all (much less her parents or even Delia's parents) and she goes about making it her personal mission to discover why and how Delia managed to die. 

Don't even get me started on how she managed to keep up in school while all this was happening. Keeping up with school is just one of those things we never question in books, right?

2. It is so messy

You know how when you read a book, there is always a certain style that the writer will adopt? Perhaps, they start each chapter a certain way or have a flashback in every other chapter. Well, with this book, it felt like there were at least five styles at work.

The chapters all started differently, and it was all so mixed up. I might as well have been reading completely different books. Not to mention, there is absolutely no proper flow of events.

How am I supposed to follow anything like this? 

3. It tries (and fails) to meld together many popular books

Suicide Notes From Beautiful Girls is pitched as being a mix of Gone Girl and Thirteen Reasons Why. Having read both books, I can totally see why. And I can also say, with utmost certainty that I think it was done extremely badly.

It was so clear that she was trying to copy the plot twist in Gone Girl while maintaining a plot line that followed Thirteen Reasons Why closely. She even tried to throw in a signature John Green character while she was at it.


THE BOOK TRIED TOO HARD TO REPLICATE GONE GIRL.
WE ALL KNOW THAT NO ONE CAN DO DARK THRILLERS LIKE GILLIAN FLYNN.
PHOTO CREDIT: GOODREADS.COM

Fine. Okay. You want to replicate book formulas that have proven wildly successful in the past. But do you really have to make it so obvious and do it so incredibly badly?

You are honestly better off reading the originals.

4. A lot of the book is left to your imagination

One of my biggest book pet peeves is when authors leave a lot up to the reader's imagination. I get the whole, 'No two readers will ever read the same book' thing, but leaving things ambiguous is not only annoying.

It also means that you will have 10 million interpretations of what happened, and no one will know what the author even meant to happen at the end.


IT ALSO SUGGESTS THAT YOU HAVE NO IDEA IF YOUR STORY MAKES SENSE,
EVEN THOUGH YOU ARE THE AUTHOR.
PHOTO CREDIT: QUICKMEME.COM

In my opinion, it's a cheap and easy way out of having to sit down and come up with a conclusion that will fit your storyline. However, what's bad here is that the author did this for many chapters.

Yes. You heard me right. It wasn't just for the conclusion. She pulled this stunt over, and over, and over again.

Not cool.

If I were you, I would rather pick up Gone Girl or even a dreaded John Green book, as opposed to this one.

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